Safety & Toxicity of Chemical Flea Preventatives

Educate yourself on these various toxic flea preventatives
and their side effects:

Preventic
http://www.ehow.com/about_5418867_side-effects-preventic.html

Amitraz
http://www.ehow.com/about_5556367_side-effects-amitraz.html

Promeris
http://www.ehow.com/about_5552416_promeris-side-effects.html

Comfortis
http://www.ehow.com/about_5547866_side-effects-comfortis.html

Trifexis

Is Frontline Safe for Your Pet?
http://www.ehow.com/about_5262823_frontline-safe-pets.html
Adverse Reactions
Merial warns on its Frontline website that skin irritation at the site of treatment is a possibility among some animals using Frontline. It also admits Frontline is a chemical pesticide.
A review of Frontline by the EPA—which approved the product’s use—also found that the manufacturer probably understated potential adverse reactions. In many pets, skin irritation reactions went significantly beyond the site of treatment. The review also showed sloughing and even chemical burns.

Long-Term Issues
However, many animal safety groups feel that Frontline may have more adverse effects than immediate reactions. Fipronil is a neurotoxin. And while Merial claims that Frontline stays solely within the skin and does not penetrate throughout the body—other studies, namely one conducted by the EPA’s Dr. Virginia Dobozy found, “significant amounts of radio-labeled fipronil were found [not only] in various organs and fat…[but they were also] excreted in the urine and feces and were present in other parts of the body…which demonstrated that the chemical is absorbed systemically.”
Such findings raise concerns among many animal activist and consumer rights groups that Frontline may have long-term neurological effects. Dr. Dobozy’s studies singled out thyroid as an area where Fipronil may spur cancer after long-term use.
Merial’s Frontline website says the company chose to distribute Frontline through vets specifically so that veterinarians can make informed judgments about whether the product is safe and appropriate of an animal—and, in this way, puts much of the onus of responsibility for the product’s use and safety onto animal health care professionals.

Read more:
http://www.ehow.com/about_5052904_frontline-top-spot-side-effects.html
http://www.ehow.com/way_5838191_precautions-frontline-pets.html
http://www.ehow.com/facts_4886643_frontline-reactions-dogs.html
http://www.ehow.com/about_5431809_adverse-reactions-frontline-spray.html
http://www.ehow.com/about_5381619_problems-frontline-spoton-dogs.html
http://www.ehow.com/how_8117961_stop-adverse-reaction-frontline.html
http://www.ehow.com/list_6883507_harmful-effects-frontline-dogs-humans.html
http://www.ehow.com/list_6611522_frontline-flea-control-warnings-reactions.html

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: